Saving the Best for Last: Why You Want to Save the Best Rooms in Your Home for the End of the Showing

Saving the Best for Last: Why You Want to Save the Best Rooms in Your Home for the End of the ShowingDo you remember when you were buying your first home?

You may have looked at dozens before you settled on the perfect home for your family to live and grow in. Perhaps another home came in a close second, but you ultimately settled on that house or apartment – the one you’re now selling.

Chances are you don’t remember anything much about most of the homes you viewed, and the things that stand out are the best (that bedroom with a fireplace!) or as bad as they can be (remember the sofa placed over the cigarette burn in the carpet?).

When you’re staging your own home and giving tours to prospective buyers, it’s important to give them something to remember, and saving the best for last is one way to do it.

First In, First Out

When it comes to memories, older isn’t necessarily better.

In fact, research shows that the brain clears out older memories to make room for new ones. That’s why what you did today is fresh in your mind, but things get hazy when you think about last week or try to remember life as a child.

If you show off the best rooms in the house toward the end of the tour, it will stick in the buyer’s mind after she leaves.

Just like you make sure the first impression is good – this is known as ‘curb appeal’ – you’ll want to end on a high note. This helps sell your home faster.

Doorway To The Mind

Entering a new room causes you to forget why you’re there in the first place. Researcher Gabriel Radvansky from Notre Dame completed a year-long study about this phenomenon, which is also known as ‘event boundaries.’ In essence, your brain compartmentalizes data to a specific location.

When you’re indoors, the walls around you literally become mental boundaries. As soon as you step through a doorway, you forget that you meant to put the phone back on the hook. For home buyers, every new doorway acts as an event boundary.

If you put the bedroom with the fireplace or the outdoor jacuzzi in the first half of your tour, buyers will walk through a lot of doorways after seeing some of the best parts of your home.

Every doorway is an opportunity for their brains to forget something that might help you when it comes to getting the sale closed. Put fewer doorways between the strongest architectural or design features and the end of the tour to make the biggest impact.

If you have further questions about staging, contact your real estate agent today for advice and strategies.

posted by Bill Desautels

P: (802) 655-9100 (800) 639-4520 x217 F: (802) 655-0400 E: condoguy@condoguy.com

The Condo Guy – Vermont condo real estate

The Condo Guy has been providing advice to buyers
and sellers of Vermont condos real estate
for nearly 30 years.

Real Estate sales and marketing in the Greater Burlington Vermont region has been my occupation and passion for more than 30 years. My focus has been on the sales and marketing of condominiums with a generous amount of single family home sales thrown into the mix. Each week I bring information of interest that not only focuses on the local home and condo real estate community but also provides context to the Burlington market in respect to larger market real estate trends. I enjoy feedback and the opportunity to meet my readers and experience their home. The Condo Guy is here for you when it comes time to buy or sell your condo or home.

Home Buying Tips: Three Items to Watch out for in a Purchase Agreement Contract

Home Buying Tips: Three Items to Watch out for in a Purchase Agreement ContractThe purchase agreement is a vitally important document that outlines the provisions, terms and conditions for the transfer of property.

It should be read carefully and any ambiguities should be clarified prior to signing. It is a legally binding contract between the buyer and seller.

The purchase agreement may vary depending on the location. Most real estate agents use a form that has been approved by a state Realtors® Association.

The seller may have a different version that was drawn up by an attorney. It should not be assumed that they are all the same.

Typically, the purchase agreement will include an inspection period. This allows the buyer time to verify the conditions stated on the purchase agreement. Three of the most important stipulations in the contract are listed below.

All Owners Must Sign the Purchase Agreement

In most cases, the purchase agreement should be signed by the legal owner of the property.

If there is more than one owner, each owner should sign the agreement. In many states, both parties in a married couple have an interest in a property even if the title is held in one party’s name alone. Therefore, the purchase agreement should be signed by both parties of a married couple.

In the event the property is being sold by a corporation, verify that the person signing the agreement is authorized to commit the corporation to the sale.

List All Fixtures to be Transferred with the Sale

The purchase agreement should list all items that are to convey with the property. “Fixtures” are considered items that are attached to the property.

Legally, they should be included with the sale, but more than a few buyers have been dismayed to find the property stripped of countertops, appliances and window coverings. Any fixtures and personal property that are part of the sale should be included in the purchase agreement.

Verify Zoning Ordinances

The purchase agreement may contain various stipulations. One should include the right to cancel the contract if zoning prohibits the use of the property as planned.

Zoning ordinances may restrict the use of buildings or land. This may prove to be an obstacle for someone who intended to include a workshop on the property. The buyer should be able to withdraw from the contract if they discover that zoning prohibits the intended use.

These agreements can be complicated, so be sure to check with a local real estate agent if you’re unsure about how to proceed.

posted by Bill Desautels

P: (802) 655-9100 (800) 639-4520 x217 F: (802) 655-0400 E: condoguy@condoguy.com

The Condo Guy – Vermont condo real estate

The Condo Guy has been providing advice to buyers
and sellers of Vermont condos real estate
for nearly 30 years.

Real Estate sales and marketing in the Greater Burlington Vermont region has been my occupation and passion for more than 30 years. My focus has been on the sales and marketing of condominiums with a generous amount of single family home sales thrown into the mix. Each week I bring information of interest that not only focuses on the local home and condo real estate community but also provides context to the Burlington market in respect to larger market real estate trends. I enjoy feedback and the opportunity to meet my readers and experience their home. The Condo Guy is here for you when it comes time to buy or sell your condo or home.

The 5-Minute Guide To Flood Insurance: What It Is, How It Works, And Whether You Need It

The 5-Minute Guide to Flood Insurance: What It Is, How It Works, and Whether You Need ItYou’ve got house insurance, and assume your property is covered for any type of detrimental occurrence that can possibly take place.

However, not all homeowners are aware that home insurance policies don’t necessarily cover damage related to a flood, as the risks are too great. As a result, homeowners must purchase flood insurance through a private company.

Floods are one of the most common hazards in the US, costing billions of dollars in damage to properties every year.

Since this is a common issue lately, the federal government updating these policies currently so please talk with your real estate professional or local insurance company for the most up to date information.

What Is Flood Insurance?

Flood insurance policies are typically made available to homeowners in flood-prone areas. The majority of insurance policies cover some form of water damage, from things like leaking faucets to bursting plumbing pipes.

However, such policies don’t cover water damage as a result of flooding of rivers or sewers that cause water to ruin a home.

Specific flood protection is provided by the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), which is run by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Standard flood insurance policies cover “direct physical damage” to a property resulting from floods.

A separate policy must be purchased to protect the belongings inside the home or building. Homeowners can buy up to $250,000 in coverage for the home, and up to $100,000 in coverage for possessions. Even renters are permitted to purchase flood insurance to cover their possessions.

How Does Flood Insurance Work?

Flood insurance isn’t sold by FEMA directly, but rather is sold to customers through private insurance agencies. Premium rates are determined by the government, and they remain consistent from one insurer to the next.

How much a homeowner pays for their own specific flood insurance depends on a number of factors, including how prone the neighborhood is to floods and how much coverage a homeowner wants. The average annual premium is approximately $520 for $100,000 worth of coverage for a property with no basement, and approximately $615 annually for a property with a basement.

Filing A Flood Insurance Claim

The claims process is like any other insurance claim. Once the claim is filed, the damage will be analyzed by an adjustor assigned by the insurance company. A “proof of loss” form will need to filled out and submitted to the insurer within 60 days of the flood occurrence.

Do You Need Flood Insurance?

It’s necessary to find out if you are eligible for flood insurance before buying it. For residents of a community to be eligible, the community needs to enforce floodplain statutes to lessen the chances of flood damage, after which FEMA ensures that such regulations are followed.

Only those who reside in a community that participates in NFIP can buy insurance – today, about 20,000 communities across the country participate in this program.

FEMA offers maps that outline what areas are at high risk for floods, and those that are at moderate-to-low risk. The law requires homeowners to have flood insurance if the properties are located in a high-risk zone and have a federally-backed mortgage. This is because properties located in these high-risk areas have a 26 percent chance of suffering flood damage during the 30 years that it would take to pay off a mortgage.

Homeowners are not required to buy flood insurance if they reside in a moderate-to-low-risk zone, though it may be a good idea to purchase it anyway. Properties outside the high-risk areas make up over 20 percent of NFIP claims. Homeowners in these areas can purchase up to $200,000 in flood insurance.

The bottom line is, even if you don’t necessarily live in a high-risk zone, this doesn’t mean your home won’t ever get flooded. Many conditions can result in flood damage, including clogged drain systems, flash rainstorms, and damaged levees.

posted by Bill Desautels

P: (802) 655-9100 (800) 639-4520 x217 F: (802) 655-0400 E: condoguy@condoguy.com

The Condo Guy – Vermont condo real estate

The Condo Guy has been providing advice to buyers
and sellers of Vermont condos real estate
for nearly 30 years.

Real Estate sales and marketing in the Greater Burlington Vermont region has been my occupation and passion for more than 30 years. My focus has been on the sales and marketing of condominiums with a generous amount of single family home sales thrown into the mix. Each week I bring information of interest that not only focuses on the local home and condo real estate community but also provides context to the Burlington market in respect to larger market real estate trends. I enjoy feedback and the opportunity to meet my readers and experience their home. The Condo Guy is here for you when it comes time to buy or sell your condo or home.

How To Maintain Your Gutters

How To Maintain Your GuttersAn entire gutter system around the home might seem expensive to many homeowners.

However, not having one could mean water pooling around your home creating a moat and costing you thousands of dollars in damage to your foundation.

So it’s a good idea to install gutters and take care of them.

Below are tips for gutter maintenance to help keep water away from your home.

Unclog The Gutters

Annual gutter maintenance includes cleaning them of debris, such as leaves, sticks or animal nests. Remove downspout cages and clean them.

Determine if they’re still in good shape or need to be replaced.

If a downspout is clogged, try to use a plumbing snake to dislodge the debris. Then use a hose to force water down the spout and hopefully remove the rest of the clog.

Check The Pitch

Gutters should be set on an incline of 1/4 inch for every 10 feet. For example, if your gutter is 20 feet long, then it should have a drop of 1/2 inch. If your gutter doesn’t have enough of an incline, then you might have water overflow because it can’t drain quick enough.

Most gutters also come to a point in the middle so the water runs both ways to downspouts on each end.

Seal Leaky Gutters

Right after a rainstorm, inspect your gutters for leaks. Look for water-saturated areas along your home underneath the gutter.

Constant leaks can cause water damage to vinyl, brick or stone siding. Use a sealant to repair small leaks or purchase a gutter maintenance patch kit for larger holes.

Replace Damaged Areas

If part of your gutter falls off or is damaged beyond repair, then you’ll need to replace it. You’ll need two ladders, a helper, new gutter cut to fit, joint connectors and sealant.

Remove old joint connectors and clean the area. Fit the new joint connectors with sealant and then install the new piece of gutter.

Install A New Downspout

You’ll need roughly the same tools for replacing the gutter, except you’ll also require downspout sections and self-tapping gutter screws.

Make sure the drop outlet at the end of the gutter fits securely into the downspout to prevent leaking.

Then fasten the joint with gutter screws and add sections as needed.

Finish with an elbowed section that extends five feet into the yard.

posted by Bill Desautels

P: (802) 655-9100 (800) 639-4520 x217 F: (802) 655-0400 E: condoguy@condoguy.com

The Condo Guy – Vermont condo real estate

The Condo Guy has been providing advice to buyers
and sellers of Vermont condos real estate
for nearly 30 years.

Real Estate sales and marketing in the Greater Burlington Vermont region has been my occupation and passion for more than 30 years. My focus has been on the sales and marketing of condominiums with a generous amount of single family home sales thrown into the mix. Each week I bring information of interest that not only focuses on the local home and condo real estate community but also provides context to the Burlington market in respect to larger market real estate trends. I enjoy feedback and the opportunity to meet my readers and experience their home. The Condo Guy is here for you when it comes time to buy or sell your condo or home.

Lowballing 101: How to Avoid Insulting a Home Seller when Making a Low Offer for Their House or Condo

Lowballing 101: How to Avoid Insulting a Home Seller when Making a Low Offer for Their House or CondoBuying a home is a huge step for people who are ready to make an investment in their future. Getting a great deal on a home is just as important and knowing how much to offer could be confusing. It is important to make sure the home seller is not insulted by the lowball offer and is ready to negotiate to make sure everyone wins.

Make a List of Necessary Improvements

One of the best ways to validate a lowball offer on a home is to list improvements that need to be made to the property. If the home needs a new roof or a new heating and air conditioning system, these are reasons to offer less than the asking price. Sometimes a home may also need new flooring, paint, or matching appliances which all cost money. The buyer can make a lowball offer stating additional expenses of making sure the home is move in ready.

Explain Any Issues with the Location

Another option when considering a lowball offer is to point out problems with the location. If the home is on a busy street or close to a manufacturing district, the buyer has legitimate concerns. In the offer, list the potential problems of living too close to fast food restaurants, train tracks, or airports. A less desirable location could equal a great buy on a new home.

Provide Pricing for Comparable Homes in the Area

A knowledgeable real estate agent can help compare homes that have sold in the area. When you are writing up a lowball offer, look at the lower priced homes that have sold in the same neighborhood. A seller will quickly realize that if he wants to sell the home, he will need to accept a reasonable offer or risk letting his house sit on the market for weeks or months.

Consider the Seller’s Reasons for Selling

Finally, the seller’s situation can also be key in getting a good deal on a home. If the seller is desperate to sell because of a job relocation or if he has already bought a new home this can be the perfect reason to make a low offer and take the home off the seller’s hands. Without insulting the seller, the buyer can make an offer for less than the asking price and agree to a quick closing.

Buying a home can be stressful and getting a good deal on the property without insulting the seller can take some negotiating. Working with a knowledgeable real estate agent will make the experience more enjoyable. Call today to make your dreams come true.

posted by Bill Desautels

P: (802) 655-9100 (800) 639-4520 x217 F: (802) 655-0400 E: condoguy@condoguy.com

The Condo Guy – Vermont condo real estate

The Condo Guy has been providing advice to buyers
and sellers of Vermont condos real estate
for nearly 30 years.

Real Estate sales and marketing in the Greater Burlington Vermont region has been my occupation and passion for more than 30 years. My focus has been on the sales and marketing of condominiums with a generous amount of single family home sales thrown into the mix. Each week I bring information of interest that not only focuses on the local home and condo real estate community but also provides context to the Burlington market in respect to larger market real estate trends. I enjoy feedback and the opportunity to meet my readers and experience their home. The Condo Guy is here for you when it comes time to buy or sell your condo or home.

Stay Organized Under The Kitchen Sink

Stay Organized Under The Kitchen SinkKitchen space is a valuable commodity. If you feel stretched for storage space, you could throw away all the flatware your mother-in-law gave you, or you could keep the flatware and learn to use the space you have – more efficiently.

The number one most likely spot to find extra storage space is right under your kitchen sink. Organize your under sink area and it will free up space all over your kitchen.

Clean It Up

The cabinet below the sink has a nasty reputation. It’s home to rusty pipes, water stains, and dead ladybugs. First thing is first – clean it up. If it still looks a little dingy, give it a fresh coat of white paint. That will lighten things up. You can also get a simple cloth mat to lie down. You can find one for less than five bucks.

Rollin’ Rollin’ Rollin’

You can find a home for just about anything under the kitchen sink. It’s a good spot for pots and pans, cleaning supplies, a trash can, or dog food. (Maybe not all of those things together – yuck.)

No matter what you decide to store in this wonderful space, it will be easier to access with the help of a rolling organization shelf.

With one of these bad boys, you won’t have to stick your head in the cabinet to find the right tool. You can find some that are made specifically for this space. Be careful though. They can get a bit pricy.

Get Hooked

The key to saving space is to build vertically. Buy some plastic hooks, and hang things under the kitchen sink. It’s a great way to store things like dishwashing gloves or dishrags. One clever trick is to secure a narrow dowel rod across the opening of the cabinet. Then you can hang any cleaning sprays across the rod. They come with a built in hook – the spray trigger.

Top Shelf Storage

You can buy amazing under-sink shelving at home store. Many of them snap easily together like Legos, and you can build them around your sink’s pipes. If you fill the cabinet with shelving, then you’re more likely to keep things organized.

If you’re like me, then after a couple of weeks, you’ll let your organized cabinet go to pot. With shelves, hopefully you won’t end up just throwing everything underneath the sink.

If you’re feeling short on kitchen space, try reorganizing. It’s a lot cheaper than getting new cabinets, and you’ll be amazed by how much space you already have. The space under the sink is a whole world of storage possibilities. If you have wasted space under the kitchen sink, then use it!

posted by Bill DesautelsP: (802) 655-9100 (800) 639-4520 x217 F: (802) 655-0400 E: condoguy@condoguy.com

The Condo Guy – Vermont condo real estate

The Condo Guy has been providing advice to buyers
and sellers of Vermont condos real estate
for nearly 30 years.

Real Estate sales and marketing in the Greater Burlington Vermont region has been my occupation and passion for more than 30 years. My focus has been on the sales and marketing of condominiums with a generous amount of single family home sales thrown into the mix. Each week I bring information of interest that not only focuses on the local home and condo real estate community but also provides context to the Burlington market in respect to larger market real estate trends. I enjoy feedback and the opportunity to meet my readers and experience their home. The Condo Guy is here for you when it comes time to buy or sell your condo or home.

Scam Alert! Three Mortgage Modification Scams to Watch out for (And How to Avoid Them)

Scam Alert! Three Mortgage Modification Scams to Watch out for (And How to Avoid Them)As if homeowners who are facing foreclosure don’t have enough to worry about, a multitude of loan modification scam artists have invaded the internet, public files and even foreclosure notices in newspapers in hopes of targeting their next victim. By identifying the top three modification scams and learning how to avoid them, at-risk homeowners can protect themselves (and their homes).

Never Pay For Mortgage Modification Assistance

Many desperate homeowners fall victim to scam artists who offer to provide them with assistance in the loan modification process for an exorbitant fee. Many times the scam artist who promises to provide assistance will require that the homeowner pay the fee upfront, after which they will provide very little assistance or simply take the money and run. Consumers should be aware that assistance and counseling services are offered for free through a number of reputable HUD approved counseling agencies.

Avoid Transferring The Deed

One popular scam that at-risk homeowners often face is the property deed scam in which scam artists promise to purchase the home in question, agreeing to let the desperate homeowner rent it out. They suggest that turning over the deed to a borrower with a better credit rating will offer additional financing opportunities, thus preventing the loss of the home. The scammer often promises to sell the home back to the homeowner, but in reality has no intention of doing so.

Many times the scam artist will sell the home to another buyer. In some instances, the crook will collect any processing fees, take the title to the home and any equity, and then leave the home to default. It is a good idea for consumers who are approached with a property deed scam to report it to the FTC.

Ignore Unrealistic Promises

Mortgage modification scammers often make promises to do such things as negotiate a solution to the foreclosure more quickly, process mortgage payments for the consumer while the negotiation is being worked out, or even guarantee a loan modification. Since the actual lender is the only one who can agree to a loan modification, and this solution requires additional processing time, overnight fixes are almost always scams. Additionally, consumers should never make mortgage payments to anyone other than their lender.

posted by Bill Desautels

P: (802) 655-9100 (800) 639-4520 x217 F: (802) 655-0400 E: condoguy@condoguy.com

The Condo Guy – Vermont condo real estate

The Condo Guy has been providing advice to buyers
and sellers of Vermont condos real estate
for nearly 30 years.

Real Estate sales and marketing in the Greater Burlington Vermont region has been my occupation and passion for more than 30 years. My focus has been on the sales and marketing of condominiums with a generous amount of single family home sales thrown into the mix. Each week I bring information of interest that not only focuses on the local home and condo real estate community but also provides context to the Burlington market in respect to larger market real estate trends. I enjoy feedback and the opportunity to meet my readers and experience their home. The Condo Guy is here for you when it comes time to buy or sell your condo or home.

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