The ‘Must Have’ List: Why Deciding Your Must-Haves Before Viewing Homes is a Great Idea

The 'Must Have' List: Why Deciding Your Must-Haves Before Viewing Homes is a Great IdeaKnowing what you want before you start looking is a big help when house-hunting. Giving the list of ‘must-have’ items to your real estate professional a few days before you begin touring listings is a great idea because they can find homes that meet as many of your criteria as possible.

It also helps on a more personal level, since being organized and knowing what you want will help you quickly identify whether or not homes meet those standards.

Is it a ‘Must-Have’ or a ‘Nice-to-Have’?

The debate between “I need it” and “I want it” is as old as time. Thinking back to childhood, when the desire for a cookie was met with mom’s stern “not before dinner,” some children seem to develop a magical ability for reasoning that voiced a desperate need for cookies before dinner, but mom was never fooled. The same goes for the ‘must-have’ list for your home search.

There are items that you want and certain ‘deal breakers’ that you cannot live without. An absolute ‘must-have’ might be proximity to work or certain schools, whereas desirable features could include a shed or a built-in barbeque pit. Knowing the difference between something you want and something that is absolutely required can save you a lot of time and money.

How to Organize an Effective List

Write down everything your dream home would have, then ask yourself how necessary each item is. Rate them by priority, whether an absolute requirement, something you would definitely prefer, something for which you would consider a compromise, and something that you don’t really care that strongly about. That first group is your ‘must-have’ list. The second is your ‘nice-to-have’ list, which is a great guiding star for choosing between homes that meet all of your ‘must-have’ items.

Some Suggestions for a Great List

Location, location, location – The top of any good ‘must-have’ list should be location. No matter what else is changed in a home, the location will always remain a constant. Decide what you want to be close to or far away from and make sure the grounds and neighborhood are all acceptable.

Bedrooms and bathrooms – Does everyone need their own room? Do you need a guest room? Could everyone share one bathroom? Ask yourself what you need at a minimum to facilitate everyone in your home.

Energy-efficient windows and good insulation – It may seem technical, but an energy efficient home can save you a lot of money in the long run. Don’t let money seep through a poorly insulated home.

Space for pets – Not everyone has pets, but for those who do it is a good idea to think of them in your ‘must-have’ list. After all, your new home is going to be Fido’s new home too! A fenced yard or a dog run might be a good idea, but also consider whether the space would allow you to add your own later.

Call your real estate professional today to start house-hunting, and don’t forget your new list!

posted by Bill Desautels

P: (802) 655-9100 (800) 639-4520 x217 F: (802) 655-0400 E: condoguy@condoguy.com

The Condo Guy – Vermont condo real estate

The Condo Guy has been providing advice to buyers
and sellers of Vermont condos real estate
for nearly 30 years.

Real Estate sales and marketing in the Greater Burlington Vermont region has been my occupation and passion for more than 30 years. My focus has been on the sales and marketing of condominiums with a generous amount of single family home sales thrown into the mix. Each week I bring information of interest that not only focuses on the local home and condo real estate community but also provides context to the Burlington market in respect to larger market real estate trends. I enjoy feedback and the opportunity to meet my readers and experience their home. The Condo Guy is here for you when it comes time to buy or sell your condo or home.

The 7 Most Unaffordable Cities for Real Estate in the USA (And 3 Affordable Gems!)

The 7 Most Unaffordable Cities for Real Estate in the USA (And 3 Affordable Gems!)As prices continue to rise across the board with everything from food to gas, it’s no wonder that real estate prices are high in many cities across the USA. While this is the case for a large number of cities, there are also certain areas in which prices are decidedly low. Here’s a small look at the most affordable and unaffordable cities within America.

The Seven Most Unaffordable Cities

Oakland, CA – Though Los Angeles and San Francisco are 2 California cities that may first come to mind, Oakland is also highly expensive when it comes to real estate, with a median home value of nearly $450,000, which is over 100 percent more than the national average.

Los Angeles, CA – Los Angeles is another city in California that is particularly unaffordable. With a median household income of just under $50,000, the exceedingly high median home value of nearly $470,000 is largely galling in its expensiveness.

Boston, MA - The Boston real estate market becomes more unaffordable with each passing year. The median home value within the city is set at well over $350,000. This, combined with the relatively high cost of living, can make for a bleak outlook.

New York City, NY – As one of, if not the most, unaffordable cities in America, NYC is also the most populous city in the United States. While the borough of Manhattan is the most expensive for real estate prices, Brooklyn and Queens aren’t much better, while the median home value of the entire city is just over $500,000.

Washington, D.C. – Though the median household income within the city of Washington D.C. is higher than the national average, the median home value sits at a substantial $443,000, with a cost of living over 40 percent above the national average.

San Francisco, CA - Living in San Francisco is extremely unaffordable, though mitigated a bit by higher household incomes. The median home value is likely the highest in the nation, at just over $750,000.

Honolulu, HI – As the capital city of Hawaii, Honolulu is much higher than the national average in everything from utilities to transportation, with the median home value sitting at $547,000.

Three Affordable Alternatives

Cleveland, OH – Though there are a surprising amount of affordable cities in Ohio, Cleveland has a median home value of just over $75,000, well below the state average of $129,000.

Knoxville, TN – Knoxville is a city in Tennessee that combines a generally low median home value of $140,000 with a median household income of just over $60,000, which is much higher than the national average.

Syracuse, NY – If you want to live in New York, but can’t afford the high real estate prices of NYC, the city of Syracuse has a low median home value of just under $80,000.

If you’re searching for the perfect city to buy your next home in, call your real estate agent today for all of the latest information.

posted by Bill Desautels

P: (802) 655-9100 (800) 639-4520 x217 F: (802) 655-0400 E: condoguy@condoguy.com

The Condo Guy – Vermont condo real estate

The Condo Guy has been providing advice to buyers
and sellers of Vermont condos real estate
for nearly 30 years.

Real Estate sales and marketing in the Greater Burlington Vermont region has been my occupation and passion for more than 30 years. My focus has been on the sales and marketing of condominiums with a generous amount of single family home sales thrown into the mix. Each week I bring information of interest that not only focuses on the local home and condo real estate community but also provides context to the Burlington market in respect to larger market real estate trends. I enjoy feedback and the opportunity to meet my readers and experience their home. The Condo Guy is here for you when it comes time to buy or sell your condo or home.

Getting Ready to Retire? Six Tips for Downsizing from Huge House to Efficient Condo

Getting Ready to Retire? Six Tips for Downsizing from Huge House to Efficient CondoIf you’re getting ready to retire, you may be thinking about downsizing. Having a large house makes sense when you’re raising kids, but once you reach your golden years, it usually makes sense to move into a smaller, more efficient condo. While downsizing may seem impossible, these six tips will help you reach your goal.

1. The Six-Month Rule

If you’re finding it hard to figure out what to keep and what to get rid of, stick to the six-month rule – if you haven’t used an item within half of a year, you probably don’t need it. Seasonal items aren’t used as much, but if you haven’t used them within a year or two, it’s safe to get rid of them.

2. Measure Twice

Measure your furniture, your current room sizes and your future room sizes. After you’ve done that, do it again. Nothing’s worse than wrestling with your heavy sofa for hours on end to find out that it won’t fit in your new living room after all.

3. Pre-Arrange Big Items

Once you know where your new home is going to be, get the floor plan or draw one up yourself. Use measurements from your furniture and other big items to figure out where you’re going to put things. If it looks crowded on paper, it will probably look even more crowded in person, so make sure your plans look okay before you decide to hire a mover or move everything yourself.

4. Get With The Times

With all the new technology coming out, it’s easy to transfer almost all of your physical media to electronic form. While you might want to keep your all-time favorite books and movies in physical form, you can put most of your reading material on an e-book reader and most of your movies on a computer or external hard drive.

5. Multiples Multiply Headaches

Yes, you need to have a soup ladle, but you don’t need five of them. If you have more than one of the same item, consider getting rid of the multiples. You’ll probably find that your kitchen is the biggest culprit as far as multiples go, but you may also find that you have three tops that are very similar in color and style or four laundry baskets even though you only do one load at a time.

6. Use Your Resources

If you’re moving to a neighborhood with a great library, plan to use it instead of bringing all of your books and movies with you. If you’re going to have a gym virtually next-door and can afford a membership, it may be time to give away your home gym equipment.

Don’t forget that your real estate agent can be an invaluable resource when downsizing, so be sure to get in touch with them before you make the jump. In summary: moving is hard enough, but downsizing is even harder. By following these tips, though, you should be able to pare down your belongings so that you will be able to live comfortably in your new home during the best years of your life.

posted by Bill Desautels

P: (802) 655-9100 (800) 639-4520 x217 F: (802) 655-0400 E: condoguy@condoguy.com

The Condo Guy – Vermont condo real estate

The Condo Guy has been providing advice to buyers
and sellers of Vermont condos real estate
for nearly 30 years.

Real Estate sales and marketing in the Greater Burlington Vermont region has been my occupation and passion for more than 30 years. My focus has been on the sales and marketing of condominiums with a generous amount of single family home sales thrown into the mix. Each week I bring information of interest that not only focuses on the local home and condo real estate community but also provides context to the Burlington market in respect to larger market real estate trends. I enjoy feedback and the opportunity to meet my readers and experience their home. The Condo Guy is here for you when it comes time to buy or sell your condo or home.

What Does It Mean To Escrow Taxes And Insurance?

Escrow schedulingThe fiscal responsibility of a homeowner extends beyond the mortgage’s basic principal and interest repayments. Homeowners are also responsible for the real estate taxes on the home and its insurance premiums, too.

Failure to pay taxes can lead to foreclosure, and failure to insure is breach of your mortgage contract.

As a homeowner, you have a choice about how you manage your real estate tax and insurance bills.  You can choose to pay them from your own bank account when the bills come due, or you can choose to pay 1/12 of the annual bill to your mortgage servicer each month, and then let your servicer pay the bills on your behalf when they come due.

Not surprisingly, servicers prefer the latter method — it reduces two major lender risks:

  1. That the home’s real estate taxes go delinquent and are sold to a third-party
  2. That the home endures catastrophic damage during a lapse of insurance coverage

In theory, when the servicer is paying the bills, the home’s taxes are always current and the home’s insurance is always paid. This method of managing taxes and insurance is commonly called “escrowing”.

To calculate a home’s monthly escrow payment is simple. Just take the sum of the annual real estate tax bills and insurance bill, then divide it by 12 months in the year.

As a example, a $4,000 annual tax bill with a $800 insurance policy = $4,800 annually = $400 paid into escrow monthly. These monies are collected as part of the regular mortgage payment along with the mortgage’s scheduled principal + interest payment.

Homeowners choosing to escrow tend to get the lowest rate, lowest fee loans. This is because lenders often charge a premium to “waive escrow” (i.e. pay their own taxes and insurance). Escrow waiver fees vary between banks, but can range up to half-percent of the amount borrowed. The larger the loan, the stiffer the penalty in dollar terms.

Choosing to waive escrow can also raise your mortgage rate by up to 0.250 percent.

If you’re unsure whether escrowing is right for you, talk to your loan officer and/or financial planner. There’s good reason to go either route depending on your profile.

posted by Bill Desautels

P: (802) 655-9100 (800) 639-4520 x217 F: (802) 655-0400 E: condoguy@condoguy.com

The Condo Guy – Vermont condo real estate

The Condo Guy has been providing advice to buyers
and sellers of Vermont condos real estate
for nearly 30 years.

Real Estate sales and marketing in the Greater Burlington Vermont region has been my occupation and passion for more than 30 years. My focus has been on the sales and marketing of condominiums with a generous amount of single family home sales thrown into the mix. Each week I bring information of interest that not only focuses on the local home and condo real estate community but also provides context to the Burlington market in respect to larger market real estate trends. I enjoy feedback and the opportunity to meet my readers and experience their home. The Condo Guy is here for you when it comes time to buy or sell your condo or home.

Giving and Getting: Why the Terms of a Home’s Sale Are Far More Important Than the Price Paid

Giving and Getting: Why the Terms of a Home's Sale Are Far More Important Than the Price PaidOne of the most significant factors home buyers and sellers focus on when buying real estate is the negotiated sales price in the purchase contract. While the sales price is undeniably important, the fact is that other terms in the sales contract may have more far-reaching and significant effects on the transaction.

In fact, with a closer look at some of the most important terms, you will see why you and your agent should actively negotiate for improved terms rather than a lower sales price.

Closing Costs

Some buyers and sellers will haggle over a few thousand dollars in the sales price without paying attention to the closing costs, but the fact is that the closing costs for a typical transaction may cost the buyer between two to five percent of the sales price on average. A sales contract may be negotiated so that the seller assumes some or most of the closing costs, and this can result in considerable savings the buyer. Likewise, when a contract is negotiated in the interest of the seller, the seller may save thousands of dollars at closing if the contract states that the buyer is responsible for these costs.

The Appraised Value

In an ideal world, a home would appraise for the contracted sales price, but this is not always the case. A sales contract may be written with terms that allow for the sales price to be renegotiated after the appraised value is confirmed, and this may benefit both parties. Some sales contracts, however, state that the negotiated sales price is final regardless of the appraised value.

The Property Inspection

Many home buyers opt to obtain a property inspection to determine if there are hidden issues with the property structure, foundation, roof, air quality and other components. Some inspections reveal that a home is in fairly good condition, but others may reveal that a property needs thousands or even tens of thousands of dollars worth of repairs. Some sales contracts may be written so that the buyer may back out of a contract within a certain period of time after receiving the property inspection report or so that the terms of the sales contract may be re-negotiated once the property inspection report has been completed.

Special Contingencies

A real estate transaction may extend for several weeks or even months while the buyer contracts with a lender, an appraiser, a property inspector and other third parties. During this period of time, many events can occur that may adjust the interest level or even the ability of the buyer and seller to fulfill the contract. Some sales contracts are written so that the buyer may opt out of the contract within a certain period of time with minimal expense and regardless of other factors related to the appraisal and inspection.

Generally, there are standard terms found in many real estate sales contracts, but these terms can be adjusted by either party to benefit buyers or sellers. Those who are preparing to buy or sell property should actively communicate their needs and desires with their real estate agent so that the contract may be negotiated with terms most favorable to their needs.

 

 

 

posted by Bill Desautels

P: (802) 655-9100 (800) 639-4520 x217 F: (802) 655-0400 E: condoguy@condoguy.com

The Condo Guy – Vermont condo real estate

The Condo Guy has been providing advice to buyers
and sellers of Vermont condos real estate
for nearly 30 years.

Real Estate sales and marketing in the Greater Burlington Vermont region has been my occupation and passion for more than 30 years. My focus has been on the sales and marketing of condominiums with a generous amount of single family home sales thrown into the mix. Each week I bring information of interest that not only focuses on the local home and condo real estate community but also provides context to the Burlington market in respect to larger market real estate trends. I enjoy feedback and the opportunity to meet my readers and experience their home. The Condo Guy is here for you when it comes time to buy or sell your condo or home.

Sellers, Beware: Five Reasons You Might Not Get Top Dollar when You Sell Your Home (And How to Avoid Them)

Sellers, Beware: Five Reasons You Might Not Get Top Dollar when You Sell Your Home (And How to Avoid Them)For most people, their home is their largest asset, so they want to maximize that asset by getting top dollar when they sell. Here are a few reasons you might not get top dollar when you sell – and how to avoid them!

Selling At The Wrong Time

From early spring to late summer is home-buying season for most people, especially those with children. Putting your house on the market during this period is when you are likely to get top dollar for it. Early fall is also a good time to list your home. Winter – especially December – is the worst time to list. If you list your home outside of prime selling season, you are likely to get less for it than you could have otherwise.

Not Staging Your Home Properly

Many people think of staging as simply rearranging the furniture or changing curtains, but there is so much more to it, and not doing it properly can mean less money for your home. To stage your home properly, you must declutter, putting knick-knacks and family pictures away. You also want to make sure your home is as clean as possible and that you correct any defects such as holes in the wall or cracked window panes. Another thing you should do as part of your staging routine is to paint your walls in neutral colors and update cabinet hardware and light fixtures that are out of date. These little changes can make a big difference.

Not Paying Attention To Curb Appeal

You can spend all the time and money necessary to spruce up the inside of your home, but if your lawn is a patch of dirt and your gutters are falling down, all that work and money can go for naught. To get top dollar for your home, you need to improve your curb appeal. This includes seeding or sodding bare spots in your lawn, trimming trees and shrubbery and fixing up home-related items such as broken concrete and sagging gutters.

Not Getting The Price Right

You might think that to get the highest price out of your house, you have to price it high. However, that’s not necessarily always the case. If you price your house too high, it can make other similar houses that are priced lower look like better deals. You should make sure to pay close attention to what comparable homes are selling for in the area and price your home accordingly.

Not Working With A Real Estate Agent

Many people think they can save a bundle selling their home by not working with a real estate agent. While you do save on the real estate commission, you can lose more than that amount by making mistakes in pricing and marketing. A real estate agent will have access to resources you don’t, such as information on buyers looking in your neighborhood. An agent will market your home, make sure it is priced accordingly and set up showings. It is worth your time and money to call an agent experienced in selling homes in your neighborhood who can give you a market evaluation.

 

posted by Bill Desautels

P: (802) 655-9100 (800) 639-4520 x217 F: (802) 655-0400 E: condoguy@condoguy.com

The Condo Guy – Vermont condo real estate

The Condo Guy has been providing advice to buyers
and sellers of Vermont condos real estate
for nearly 30 years.

Real Estate sales and marketing in the Greater Burlington Vermont region has been my occupation and passion for more than 30 years.  My focus has been on the sales and marketing of condominiums with a generous amount of single family home sales thrown into the mix. Each week I bring information of interest that not only focuses on the local home and condo real estate community but also provides context to the Burlington market in respect to larger market real estate trends.  I enjoy feedback and the opportunity to meet my readers and experience their home.  The Condo Guy is here for you when it comes time to buy or sell your condo or home.

What’s Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week – July 7, 2014

What's Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week July 7 2014

Last week’s economic news was mixed, but economic reports for Non-Farm Payrolls and the National Unemployment rate suggest a strengthening labor sector. Pending Home Sales surpassed expectations in May and conversely, construction spending was lower than expected. Here are the details.

Pending Home Sales Reach Highest Level in Eight Months

The National Association of REALTORS® reported that pending home sales in May rose by 6.10 percent over April’s reading. May’s reading was 5.20 percent lower than for May 2013. The index reading for May reached 103.9 as compared to April’s index reading of 97.9. Results for all regions were positive for May:

- Northeast: 8.80%

- West 7.60%

- Midwest 6.30%

- South 4.40%

An index reading of 100 for pending home sales is equal to average contract activity in 2001; pending home sales are a gauge of upcoming closings and mortgage activity.

CoreLogic Home Price Index Reflects Slower Price Gains

National home prices rose by 1.40 percent in May and 10 states posted new month-to-month highs, while year-over-year reading slipped from 10.00 percent in April to 8.80 percent in May. Home prices remain about 13.50 percent lower than their 2006 peak.

The overall rate of construction spending slowed in May to an increase of 0.10 percent from April’s reading of 0.80 percent and against expectations of 0.70 percent. Residential construction spending dropped by 1.50 percent in May.

Freddie Mac’s weekly survey of average mortgage rates brought good news as the rate for a 30-year fixed rate mortgage dropped by two basis points to 4.12 percent. The average rate for a 15-year fixed rate mortgage was unchanged at 3.22 percent, as was the average rate for a 5/1 adjustable rate mortgage at 2.98 percent. Discount points were unchanged at 0.50 percent for a 30-year fixed rate mortgage and 15-year fixed rate mortgages. Discount rates rose from 0.30 to 0.40 percent for 5/1 adjustable rate mortgages.

Jobs Up, Unemployment Rate Lower

ADP payrolls, which measures private-sector job growth, reported 281,000 new jobs in June as compared to a reading of 179,000 new private-sector jobs in May. The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Non-Farm Payrolls report for June surpassed expectations of 215,000 jobs added with an increase of 288,000 jobs against May’s reading of 224,000 jobs added.

The national unemployment rate fell to 6.10 percent against predictions of 6.30 percent and May’s reading of 6.30 percent.

No news was released on Friday, which was a national holiday.

What’s Ahead

This week’s scheduled economic is lean with no events set for Monday. Job Openings, the minutes from the most recent FOMC meeting, along with regularly scheduled weekly reports on mortgage rates and new jobless claims round out the week’s economic news.

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